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of the bill, a health clinic in the city of sunrise, florida, as the william "bill" kling v.a. clinic. william passed away sadly on august 6 at age 84. my deepest appreciation goes out to the committee on veterans' affairs and chairman miller who is a great friend from the state of florida, for supporting this effort and helping it to come to the floor. bill was a member of our greatest generation of americans, serving our nation in the navy during world war ii. but this was far from over when he returned from war. in fact, it was just beginning. bill claims -- became our strongest advocate and helping generations of veterans as they returned to civilian life. he worked tirelessly to make sure our veterans were getting the benefits they deserved, from education to quality health care through our v.a. system. i'm sure our florida colleagues will tell you that bill was a force to be reckoned with, pushing the urgency of the issue at hand. i know he will be sorely missed. in particular, my thoughts and prayers goes out to bill's family, including his daughter. i had the distinct pleasure, mr. spe
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states -- presidents william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio elector college, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, secretary jon husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
mayor of kansas city, missouri, but he's also an ordained methodist pastor. pastor cleaver is frequently called upon for words to deliver at my whip meeting on thursday mornings. i have said they are the highlight of our week, in many respects. emanuel cleaver speaks to us about humanity, about caring, about respecting each of our colleagues on either side of the aisle, of respecting and honoring our responsibilities to our fellow citizens. in short, emanuel cleaver on a weekly basis appeals to the best that is within us, to reflect the best that is america. emanuel cleaver will shortly be succeeded as president of the c.b.c. by marcia fudge from ohio. like emanuel cleaver, a leader of conscience, a leader of great ability and a leader who will reach out to all of us as well and continue to lead this organization that we know is the conscience of the congress. as we talk about creating jobs, as we talk about caring for one another, as we talk about makinging life better for all americans, there is no more compelling voice than the congressional black caucus towards that end. and there ha
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
personally is that 18 years ago the city of charleston county county-wide gave me an opportunity to represent him based on values and issues. a couple of years later the folks from the house gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and their values. two years ago the first district gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and values. what i've not ever heard on the campaign trail was besides the fact that you're black or because you're black, here's what we want to do. they've asked me questions about values and issues, and that's an amazing thing. i think it speaks to the evolution of south carolina and of our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people in our nation and specifically of our state. i would say this -- more importantly than the complexion that i have, i think back to growing up in a single-parent household. i'd love to speak to the single moms out there and say don't give up on your kids. it may get tough, it may be challenging, but all things are truly possible in this nation. i was speaking with jim clyburn, another part of the family here. i was talkin
sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and it's a very emotional one. it's at least an emotional issue as abortion or the death penalty. and emotions run high here. and we have a very deeply divided country. we have a large chunk of the count
effectiveness. the partisan rank that too oftendom nates this city was unaccept to believe him. his focus was on people, on the infrastructure they depend on in the communities, on the must vulnerable. he was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without dan inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored and he made it a better place to live and work for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from another state far from washington d.c. i learned a lot from him about how to advocate for the people who elect you and make sure they never get lost here in the mix. through his quiet and shiney example we learned about bipartisan ship. we all learned a bit more about effectiveness. he knew how to get things done more than anyone i have seen before or will since. we learned a bit more about hume illty. you never here danny talk about himself. we learned about respect, kindness towards all, not just those who agree with you. and he helped us remember every single day why he came here in the first place. yath you how man
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
community outside of chicago that passed a city ordinance or you could not own a gun. that, a small community outside of atlanta passed a city ordinance requiring every household to own a gun. they had an exception for those who had a conscientious objection to owning a gun, but what happened? the crime rate skyrocketed. why? because the criminals knew that the citizens could not protect themselves. the criminals went to places where the criminals could carry out their activities and do their stealing and things without having the danger of someone trying to protect their property or their lives. the crime rate went up markedly in that area. the real solutions -- i am working on solutions. both parties are guilty of spending money we do not have. we have to stop that and we have to start looking at areas of the federal government where we can send those dollars back to the states. my job under the constitution as it was intended was to come into washington making sure we have a strong national defense, making sure our foreign affairs are at the best interest of this country, voting
to the republican line from new york city. caller:hi, i am a physician and worked in the time of son of sam and i treated one of his last victims. the destruction that a sudden killing like this is enormous. i think the mental health screening has to be more pori part of this. the fact that we cannot commit people showing extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe bid
. it is not just in our inner cities. it is not just in our urban settings. it is not just in our suburbs. it is not just in our rural neighborhoods. it is everywhere. we cannot escape this scourge unless you leave us, mr. president. we call on all our members congress. have courage. the country is with you. lead us. lead us out of this shadow, out of this dark valley of the shadow of death. lead us. lead us. let us look the one who will lead us even when men fail us every time. let us look to our god. we call on you, our god, to comfort the hearts of every mother and father who has lost their child in newtown, connecticut today. we ask you to comfort the hearts of the mothers who lost her son in chicago today, who lost her daughter in philadelphia today, who lost their teenager in oakland today, in detroit, in camden, new jersey, in new orleans, in alaska, in missouri, in alabama, all across this country. comfort our hearts, and bring us out of this dark, dark place of sadness. give us gives us courage that we may act. give us wisdom that we may act together. give us peace, for you say,
, these are the largest cities. that's where we are most spectrum contrained. that's where broadcasting is most profitable because there are more eyeballs condensed, compacted in a small area, like new york city, where there are 28 tv stations. in order to yield 60 megahertz, let's say, per six megahertz per tv station, they will have to go dark or channel share in a new york city, for instance. that's more than a third. that's a lot. i hope that's the case. i hope it actually happens. i am not convinced that it will. i think we need to be more cautious and sort of fiscally conservative with some of the assumptions that went in the c.b.o. or o.m.b. estimates. >> if i can emphasize because there's some components of the bill for public -- components of the bill for subsafety, but another piece of that legislation was to have revenue to pay down the national debt. $15 billion is right now estimated to be raised that will be raised to pay down the debt. as you're conducting the auction, clearly you want to free up more spectrum and that's going to create jobs. that's going to allows to do a lot more things w
to reclaim land in that city that was pushed aside by saddam hussein when he was dictator. there is a problem with the rise of al qaeda in iraq and bank at the same time, iraq has not pulled over like they did in 2005. i think that is in part because all major parties are not prepared to go to the brink like that and i think there is some hope that over time the u.s. engagement with the iraqi military can be a positive thing. you can see if things -break the right way with iraq, you see a relationship with the army that would be much different than the u.s. relationship with the egyptian military, that you would really find a more mature relationship. host: our guest is a senior national security correspondent. from minnesota on our republican line, go ahead. color code do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to -- caller: do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to come to a head pretty soon? do you think we should put pressure on israel to get rid of their nuclear weapons? if we really want peace over there, shouldn't we want everyone in that region do not hav
. host: -- that is just a portion of what is in the new york times this morning. next is mary in sun city, california. go ahead. we are listening. caller: i am in the rental business in california. i hear california is very big on welfare and section 8. i see there are so many programs where somebody gets to stay home and the government will pay a three-bedroom rent and they only pay $14 a month. they stay home for 10 years, 15 years, or whatever simply because they have children. being in the military, a lot of my friends, the parents work. but these people are not in the military and they get medical, they get food stamps, they get wic. there's never a change in the programs to motivate people to go to work. host: what would you like to see done? caller: i would like to see that the welfare and section 8 programs and these programs out there, that they tell the people you go to work and we will subsidize -- we will give you a small check to help you support your little family. a lot of these people on these programs are not married. they are single parents. my friends in the military ar
: and that the wall street journal, their front page -- back to the telethons, panama city on the line for republicans. go ahead. caller: yes, good morning. i just wanted to say, we should be able to vote to congress out on no-confidence. we should have been no confidence bill to get them all out. >host: do you think that would work? caller: it would be better than what we have now. look at what it costs us per day. we are in a gridlock. it is causing tax payers millions of dollars. let's vote about and start over. host: what makes you think if they brought in 535 new people that the situation would be better than it is right now? caller: it would not be better than it is right now, but it would be better a in the future. it would get to a better place. i think the fear of a no- confidence vote might stir somebody -- it might get people working a little bit more aggressively. host: as we continue the discussion on the senate negotiating a fiscal of deal, we want to look at other items this morning. this is from "the new york times." mike on the line for independents. your thoughts on that the senate n
and started to help the rebels, which at that time were just rebels, no control of any city. he stayed in a hotel and worked to court made international support for the rebels. he was not even the massacre at the time. after the rebels won the war, he said of this compound as a temporary facility, which the report is critical of. it was a failure and a precursor to this incident, the fact that this mission was deemed a temporary facility which allow the state department to neglect security requirements that would have been put in place had been declared an official consulate. that is a huge part of the story. ambassador stevens believed that because he had been such a good friend of the libyan people, especially in benghazi, as they were struggling, that he had a relative amount of safety. he is often described as a man that would eat at local restaurants, he would meet people wherever they were. it is not totally clear why he was in benghazi that night but he did have a light security contingent, which was part of his decision the bottom line is our diplomats have to get outside the w
new york city. caller: obama was quite intelligent on that first debate because he let romney state his entire case. most people cannot remember that many facts and it must have given obama a chance to check off the facts. he josh credibility just by appearing on the stage, so for going word for word it just up to the answer -- upped the ante. he let the press do his talking about a 47% for the rest of the week. he let the press carry aloft for him. host: glenn thrush. guest: they should have hired you to do these been. i'm from new york and i used to play in the schoolyard. there was no intention for it to go down that way. the stock out the words was just -- the staff was ashen faced. they did not know it at the time. host: stuart stevens loved the idea of having an american icon as a warm-up act. they had been assured that clint eastwood would more or less played by their rules but they had not enforced any discipline. he delivered a bizarre rambling lecture to an empty chair that became an instant you to classic and not in a good way. guest: he and the campaign manager for ronny
than the shootings on the streets of chicago, my hometown of east st. louis and so many other cities. sadly, it will take more than 27 victims including 20 children a at sandy hook grade school in connecticut. what it will take is a majority of americans and a majority of thoughtful gun owners and hunters to agr that there must be a reasonable limit on gun ownership an weapons. the supreme court acknowledged that the second amendment rights are not absolute, so can we come together and agree that americans have the right to own and use firearms for sport and self-defense with certain limits? we must institute reasonable commonsense limits such as barring those with a history of mental instability, those with a history of violent crime and subject to restraining orders and those whose 2345eu78s have already been placed on a terrorist watch list. they shouldn't own guns. and those straw purchasers who are fencing for drug gangs and other criminal thugs? how about the gun dealers who look the other way when they come to buy those weapons? we have to deal with them realistically and firm
more money on our social security. all of us should protest. i do not care what city or state we belong in. we should protest against this do-nothing congress. host: you can always check out our special page on our website, set up for all things related to the fiscal cliff. also, a live twitter stream of comments from viewers and reporters. we will leave our phone calls there for the time being. also on line, check out the resource area. it has related links to try to get your hands wrapped around the issue of the fiscal cliff. all of that on the website. and earlier today, president obama, vice president and biden, and former president and bill clinton spoke at the services for the hawaiian senator who died of respiratory complications on monday, at age 88. he will be returned home to hawaii tomorrow, and a public service will be held at the national memorial cemetery of the pacific on sunday, before he is laid to rest in his home state. the service is about one hour and 45 minutes. >> i am resurrection, and i am light, says the lord. whoever has faith in the show have life, though he
year, one half of all children in new york city will be bored to indigent parents. host: your point in all this? caller: my point is, the money that is being spent on these other entitlement programs have to be cut because these people are able to get out of work and make a nice living, whereas the elderly cannot. guest: i think the main thing to pay it to do about the federal budget -- and this is something that people say flippantly some times. at the u.s. government is an insurance company with an army. when we talk about the insurance company part, we are talking about medicare and social security, and to some degree medicaid. those are programs that benefit the middle class and the poor, mainly through retirement. the other thing that people talk about, those are very small parts in the federal budget compared to medicare and social security. really, is not a question of needing to cut these programs. it is that they are growing more quickly than the economy, larger than they have been in the past, and what we need to decide as a nation is, are willing to pay substantially high
journal with charts showing various cities around the u.s. and how well they have done in the last year or so. overall, still down. phoenix, up 21% this year. but home prices are still down 46% from the 2008-09 low end. detroit up 10%, but still off 327% from there. -- from their peak. and this article appeared in yesterday's wall street journal -- what is the realtor association's view on the national governments refinance programs they have offered and how do you see expansion of that program? guest: it has worked. this program specifically addressed responsible homeowners. these are homeowners who happen to be under water, yet they have been making their mortgage payments. they may be stuck at 6% or 7% interest rate. the prevailing market interest rate is about 3.5% or 4%. government stepping in to say you have been responsible even in this difficult economic circumstances, if you have to pay your mortgage on time and not defaulted, so let's get you into the current market rate. from the private lenders perspective, they are saying under water, forget it, we will not refinance. for g
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